Variable Data: a key future trend

Variable Data: a key future trend Variable Data Printing is nothing new, but its significance to the future of how we develop products and think about shopping is huge. It’s also a really neat example of how little things can shift entire markets from very humble beginnings… in the case of VDP it began as a clever trick to make …

Having an iWatch crisis yet?

Having an iWatch crisis yet? The iWatch is coming… and it’s thrown me into a state previously unknown in sales and marketing which I’m calling “pre-purchase dissonance”. You might already know the more familiar term “Post-purchase dissonance” which describes how people feel when they worry the product they’ve just bought isn’t as good as they thought it was when they …

The ‘P-Crunch’ Part 2: Facebroke?

The ‘P-Crunch’ Part 2: Facebroke? In part 1 of this essay I talked about the long term viability of open public networks like Twitter, and considered how other open online messaging forums like chat rooms and message boards moved from universal, unmoderated access to moderated, governed spaces.

Marketing vs linguistics? “For free”

Marketing vs linguistics? “For free” It’s a minor thing, really. Pointless to moan about it. But have you noticed how the term “for free” is now commonplace? Of course you have. But have you wondered why? You see, linguistically speaking it doesn’t make sense. Free isn’t a quantity, it’s a property. What this shows is how language keeps evolving.

The rise of the jargonist… or “how to leverage toss”

The rise of the jargonist… or “how to leverage toss” We all know what jargon is. It makes us groan and roll our eyes. Jargonism is all around us, especially in the worlds of social media and computers. You might think you’re immune to its effects but that’s not giving it the weight it deserves.

Who killed the killer app?

Who killed the killer app? I recently had an exchange of views with a Microsoft employee on LinkedIn, debating the reasons why Windows Phone and Surface haven’t landed a decent slice of the mobile device market. I suggested it was because MSFT waited too long to see if (as Steve Ballmer famously pondered) a $400 cell phone would ever catch …

How to give your brain a holiday: The “neurochemical cognitive reboot” tip

How to give your brain a holiday: The “neurochemical cognitive reboot” tip Holidays are an interesting thing because their nature changes as your life changes. They’re also really good examples of how your cognitive processes can be affected by physical activity, proving the paradoxical idea that lying around for two weeks doing nothing can be less relaxing than slaving over …

Digital identity is the currency of the future – here’s why

Digital identity is the currency of the future – here’s why I’ve always liked Ebay. I’m not an obsessive bargain hunter, but for some things, it’s the only marketplace. In my case, vintage wristwatches, old guitar spare parts and specialist marine invertebrates like copepods and live phytoplankton.

“BBA” decision making: How to spot someone is making an emotional business decision

“BBA” decision making: How to spot someone is making an emotional business decision The problem of emotional decision making in business is something we all like to think we’ve got a handle on. You know the difference between a logical, sensible decision maker and an emotional prima donna, right? Wrong. Actually, there is an emotional dimension to all decisions, because …

Head & Shoulders, dandruff and Zero Sum game theory…

Head & Shoulders, dandruff and Zero Sum game theory… You must have seen the Head & Shoulders TV ad turkey with England Goalie Joe Hart. Poor Joe. Despite having a haircut so short it seems highly unlikely that he could suffer with dandruff in the first place, Joe has a confidence issue over his flaky scalp.